Liverpool porcelain plate, James Pennington of Brownlow Hill, underglaze ‘Fenced Garden’ pattern, c.1763-5

$1,950.00 AUD

Early Liverpool porcelain plate, by James Pennington of Brownlow Hill, boldly painted in underglaze blue with an Oriental ‘Fenced Garden’ pattern, a large rock central with a peony and bamboo growing through, a fence behind the wall with a lattice border, the rim with three large oriental flower groups in the manner of contemporary Liverpool delft.
Unmarked,
circa 1763-5

22.3cm
Excellent condition

Bears a BADA ‘Guaranteed Antique’ decal from importation into Australia mid-20th century.

Ref. Hillis ‘Liverpool Porcelain’ 4.97 for another of this pattern, described as ‘well painted’ c. 1763-5, the first years of James Pennington at his rownlow Hill works; Hillis states “Early examples that can be attributes to James at Brownlow Hill are scarce but a few round plates are known that seem to relate to this period’.
This is a fine example of such a rarity, and in superb condition.


The Porcelain of James Pennington.

James was the first of three brothers in Liverpool (also John & Seth) who all made porcelain there. James was earlier, and his wares of better quality. He took over the earlier factory of William Reid & Co, who had opened the first porcelain works in Liverpool with the help of a certain Mr William Ball. This potter appears to have been an active agent in the establishment of several of the earliest London porcelain works, with a connection found to both Bow (1745&46) and Limehouse (1747&48). One trail of research has led to a Mr Ball in Philadelphia in the early 1770’s, helping the fledgling American attempt at porcelain making by Bonnin & Morris.  With Ball’s expertise, Reid began making a bone-ash body porcelain around 1756, and when James purchased the Reid concern at Brownlow Hill around 1763, he continued to make this same body. Around 1767 he moved to another Liverpool pot works, Park Lane, and the wares connected to this address are different to the earlier period, having a ‘…very thin, rather poor glaze and a thin, brittle body’.

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