Bone China

A porcelain body developed in Britain in the late 18th century, which included a large amount (up to 50%) of bone ash. This body had the  advantage of being white, translucent, and durable, the latter meaning the ‘thermal shock’ of hot/cold water being applied to the body was absorbed very well. As a result, pouring…

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Cantonese

A style originating in Canton/Guangzhou, ceramics & enamels with distinct rich grounds & panels of figures, a.k.a. Rose Medallion

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Caughley

Years active: c.1775 – c.1799 Location: Broseley, Shropshire, England Founded by Ambrose Gallimore and Thomas Turner, Caughley porcelain works was a producer of fine tea-wares and and serverware that was often compared to the likes of Worcester. Throughout the factory’s operational years, it found its niche in producing mostly blue printed and painted wares, often…

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Coffee Cups

Cup-form coffee drinking vessel, having a curved lower profile and foot smaller than lip, a handle to one side.

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Dihl et Guérhard, 1781-1828

Dihl et Guérhard, Paris Porcelain manufacturers 1781-1828 The firm of Dihl et Guérhard was initially established in 1781, under the patronage of the duc d’Angoulême – even though he was only 5 at the time!  This Royal Patronage was essential, as the Royal Decree of 1766 had given the monopoly of Gold & Colour decoration…

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Drybody

Describes a fine-textured, vitrified stoneware pottery that needs no glaze to retain liquids – so it keeps a ‘dry-body’.

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Florence Royce

Florence Royce

This interesting female ceramic artist is local to our Geelong premises, with the castellations of the Gordon Technical College always on the skyline outside our front windows. Born in 1874 in Geelong, she took up china painting in the early 20th century, and by 1910 was teaching it at The Gordon. She received multiple prizes…

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Gardner of Moscow

Gardner was an Englishman who created a successful business near Moscow in 1765. Production was best in the early 19th century, and often of a very ‘French’ appearance.

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Grandeln

Grandeln is the German term for the canine teeth of deer, seen mounted in Victorian jewelry as a good luck charm.

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