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Great (Exhibition) Expectations

A surprise attribution leads to a fascinating provenance. Pair of well-painted plates, unmarked, maker uncertain…. A flamboyant pair of plates with startling orange borders had been in our storeroom for some time before their significance was unearthed, purely by chance. Their shape is a common ‘lobed’ form, and made by many porcelain makers in the…

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Review: “Worcester Porcelain – Two Australian Collections”

2016 publication, hardback, 208 pages, 171 items illustrated in full colour This quality 2016 book on 18th century British porcelain has a surprising local origin in Australia. The authors are regulars to any local sales or shops with a hint of Worcester porcelain in Australia, and overseas as well; the result is to be seen…

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John turns 80!

A special milestone occurred this week, with John Rosenberg, founder of Moorabool Antiques, turning 80. John Rosenberg turns 80, 2019 Back in the 1950’s, a young John Rosenberg could have never believed he would be proprietor of a business such as Moorabool was to become. His first purchase at the age of 12 was a…

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Machin & Potts… a detective tale

Machin Attribution

There are two pottery jugs in this week’s ‘Fresh’, sourced from the same amazing collection of early 19th Century pottery & porcelain as all the similar pieces we have released recently. Our research team had been working overtime (thanks John!) and poured through every book in the library to help identify the vast number of…

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The Boyd ‘Medieval’ chess set

A fascinating and most probably unique creation is also the most modern item in stock at Moorabool – dating to the 1960’s, it is an Australian Pottery ‘Medieval’ chess set, by David & Hermia Boyd, members of the remarkably artistic Boyd family. Medieval Chess set by David & Hermia, 1960’s David & Hermia Boyd Chess…

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Sir John Franklin portrait discovery, c.1828

Sir John Franklin silhouette

An exciting find at Moorabool is this portrait silhouette of Sir John Franklin. His name is very familiar in Tasmania; as stated on the back of this newly discovered portrait, he was Governor there 1837-43, and his name appears across the state with a town on the Huon River, and a major river which narrowly…

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A Ming Dynasty Dragon roof tile, 16th – 17th century

Ming Rooftop tile Dragon

Ming Dynasty Roof Tile A fresh item to Moorabool is this quirky Ming Dynasty roof tile figure. As the name suggests, these were part of the roof decoration on Chinese buildings. Ming Dynasty Roof Tile   Many different ‘characters’ appear as roof tile figures, each with a symbolic purpose. Our Dragon is actually a water…

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